Visual content plays a big role in the success of a content marketing strategy. We've found that The Adobe Creative Suite will set content marketers up with everything they need to lay out ebooks, design infographics, create social images, etc. The team will find themselves in InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Acrobat pretty frequently. For a free alternative, try Canva. This lightweight software makes it easy for designers of all levels to create quality visual content -- things like presentations, cover photos, ads etc. 
The reliable source of traffic and leads from your evergreen content will give you the flexibility to experiment with other marketing tactics to generate revenue, such as sponsored content, social media advertising, and distributed content. Plus, your content will not only help attract leads -- it will also help educate your target prospects and generate awareness for your brand.

You have to be clear with your copy. If you’re selling yourself as a social media marketer, you can’t simply say, “If you need a social media marketer, I’m your guy (or gal).” You want to actively show your potential clients why they should choose your services (for example, Choose me because I have five years’ worth of experience in improving social media awareness for big brands, like…).


We have the team. We have the technology. Now we have to actually start "doing" the content marketing. In this blog post, we can't cover every manner of sin when it comes to creating content, but we can go over 1) the types of content assets a content marketing team could be creating to demonstrate the breadth of the opportunities available to the content marketing team, and 2) who should be involved in creating those assets.
Acknowledge payment of an overdue balance Acknowledge the Return of an Item For Exchange, Refund or Credit Announce a business anniversary Announce a change in policy or fee amount Announce a change of business address Announce a new business location Announce a new business, store, or branch office Announce a new product or service Announce a price decrease Announce a price increase Answer a request for information on a product or service Apologize for an invoice or billing error Ask for an investment Change an order Complain about a delay in an order Confirm an order you have made Confirm receipt of an order from a customer Confirm the receipt of a package or other item(s) Confirm the sending of a package or other item(s) Decline orders but offer an alternate or substitute item Delegate follow-up on a complaint from a customer Follow up with a reminder Grant approval for credit Introduce a new employee Notify a customer that a shipment has been delayed or that merchandise ordered is not available Notify a shipper that an order is incomplete, incorrect or damaged; also, return unwanted or incorrect merchandise Offer a sales position to someone who has not applied for employment Offer the use of a charge account Prepare a prospective customer to receive a sales telephone call Request a discount or a complimentary product or service Request a refund or reimbursement Request a rush order Request additional money or information before you can fill an order Request an increased credit line Request estimates or bids Request information on a product or service Request samples or information about products or services Thank a business for good service, low prices, or professional courtesies Thank a customer for a payment Thank a customer for purchasing a product or service Transmit a payment Transmit a shipment of merchandise that a customer has purchased Transmit an advertising copy to a magazine or other media Transmit informational or sales literature Use a referral in a sales letter Write to former stockholders or investors
At my own company we’ve used content marketing to grow more than 1,000% over the past year. Potential clients find our content, find value in it, and by the time they contact us they’re already convinced they want to work with us. We don’t have to engage in any high pressure sales tactics, it’s merely a matter of working out details, signing an agreement, and getting started. The trust that usually needs to be built up during an extensive sales cycle has already been created before we know the potential client exists.
Talk about the benefits of your product or service. These benefits will show your readers that they need what you have to offer. To make it more readable, use arrows, bullet points or other types of clever formatting. If you have a lot to say about your product or service, don’t hesitate to include everything. Unlike other business letters, one meant for sales doesn’t have to be just one page.
"Ideation" is a marketing industry buzzword that describes the creative process of finding a subject, title and angle to write about; and ideation begins with analytics. Most ideation is done in a team setting, but freelance writers are usually on their own. Which is why it's helpful to know how professional marketing teams generate ideas. Before doing that, successful content writers need to: 
Theory #1: The mere act of publishing content on a regular basis does a lot of the "distribution" work for you -- if you consider search engines a distribution channel. (Which I do, considering how often people use them to find content.) If you create content on a regular basis that's informed by keyword research and optimized for search, Google takes care of the rest of your content distribution plan.
Reorganize: This isn’t just an efficient way to pump out new content—it’s also a smart way to reach members of your audience who like to consume content in different ways. Some people you’re marketing to may like ebooks, while others prefer infographics, and still others learn best from slide decks. Slicing and dicing allows you to reach more people with less effort.
I guess I’ve never had a real gig yet… I’ve written website content for clients many, many times. I’ve also had gigs writing SEO content. But I’ve never really truly had a copywriting gig yet. Thanks for this article. To be honest, I’ve only buzzed through it quickly just now (#MeWantsTShirt), but it actually looks really good and I plan to re-read it carefully, following all the helpful links (especially the ones on the copywriting resources… I really want to be good, no… GOODER, at the art of written persuasion), and bookmarking it. (By the way, offering a paid service to rewrite websites is brilliant. I’ve offered to review and improve websites from a CRO perspective… but I never thought of offering a “better copy” only approach. Nice!
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